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Why this particular weekend?

The timing (November 5-8) was chosen for a few reasons. The first is as a nod to Feminist Fair – a beloved event that normally takes place the Sunday of the first weekend in November. The second reason is to provide ample time for the consolidation, packing, and shipping of purchases well in advance of the holidays.

Some information on “Why?”

Why online goes without saying. COVID-19 has drastically changed how we can and should interact with each other. Especially for at risk individuals, COVID-19 has dramatically changed the accessibility of in person events.

But, we’re far from the only online show. In fact, there is likely even other shows the same weekend. So why this one?

We have noticed a trend that, despite the emergence of online shows, not all shows have been for all creators. Outside of events specifically intended for the progressive community, creators can run into barriers to having some, if not all, of their works featured. Some organizers may not be comfortable with topics such as rape culture or reproductive rights being part of their website. It may not fit with their brand or asthetic.

Creators with these works can use platforms such as Etsy or their own shops – but this doesn’t solve the missed opportunity of a community market. Nor does it allow for consolidated shipping with other vendors.

Pride, Not Prejudice is an online, consolidated craft and community fair for all the social justice warriors with strong, progressive opinions who may not always fit the aesthetic of other, mainstream craft fairs.

Who is Pride, Not Prejudice for?

Pride, Not Prejudice is for individuals who might be at risk of being called “social justice warriors,” and their friends. It is for the community of people who give a damn. It is for folks who proudly wear labels such as feminist, queer, Black, and progressive and those who will stand up for justice and against injustice.

Did vendors need to make explicitly feminist/queer goods to be included?

We curated a selection of creators and businesses who are progressive – that doesn’t mean that what they make needed to be explicitly so.

Some examples of what we were open to: art with queer/feminist/progressive leanings, queer/feminist/progressive led businesses, and businesses looking to make progressive strides in the world. Or all three.

And we are so proud with what we have curated.